The Benefits Of Metal Roof Over Tile Roof

HERE’S THE NITTY GRITTY OF RESTORING OLD TILE ROOFS

Restoring old tile roofs presents an intricate challenge for any roofing contractor. If not done correctly, newly restored roof tiles can lose their beauty in just a few short years. Often times, the reason for this occurring is that the contractor didn’t know how to deal with older style tiles which need additional preparation and care. An old tile roof can still be serviceable with a long life ahead. But prior to any restoration work, it will need correct treatment to protect and prepare it for a beautiful, long lasting top coat. 

When just pressure cleaning won’t cut it

If you’ve got a house with old roof tiles, even straight after pressure cleaning, you can still feel grittiness. You mightn’t think it’s a biggie…it’s just a bit of loose grit, right? Let me tell you, if there is any loose sediment, the surface will move under the new top-coat, causing it to lift. Your newly restored tiled roof will look rubbish in a few short years. That IS a biggie!

To prevent this from occurring, a specific type of primer must always be used to bind any loose sediments down. Not all roofing contractors are experienced in restoring old tile roofs as it’s a bit of a specialised area. They may not be aware of which is the right type of primer to use or the correct preparation steps to take prior to restoration.

HERE IS SOME HANDY ADVICE TO HELP YOU ADD YEARS OF LIFE TO YOUR ROOF.

RESPRAYING YOUR ROOF

Exposure to UV, pollution and other environmental factors can take their toll. If you have a concrete tile, composite or metal roof, it will gradually dull with time. This should be expected, but is also easily fixed with regular respraying.

EFFLORESCENCE – WAIT, WHAT’S THAT?

Occasionally, natural salts within concrete roof tiles can migrate to the surface to form a whitish-greyish discolouration. It’s called efflorescence and it’s just a temporary cosmetic thing. You will find that it should disappear on its own over time.

MOISTURE MEANS MOSS

Moss and lichen spores are everywhere in the air and they can settle and grow on most roofing materials. Moss and lichen grow only where there is sufficient build-up of moisture and dirt particles to support them. Removing the growth is easy. A quick turn with a low-pressure hose or a chemical solution will be enough to remove unwanted growth.

CHECK YOUR GUTTERS, DOWNPIPES AND VALLEYS

Uncleared gutters, downpipes and valleys are a common cause of roof leaks. You should give them an inspection regularly – at least once a year.

PAINTED ROOFS NEED REPAINTING

If you choose to have your concrete roof painted you will need to respray it again every five years or every so often to retain that fresh-coat lustre.

TYPES OF TILE ROOFS:

  • Clay-This is by far the most popular and most used type of tile roof. The clay tiles can be glazed or unglazed.
  • Granite-A newcomer to the tile roof, granite tiles are lovely and come in ivory or black.
  • Slate-Slate tiles have been used for over 1000 years and are very durable and make a beautiful roof.
  • Concrete-This medium for roofing tiles has come into its own in the last 100 years.

COMMON PROBLEMS TO WATCH FOR:

Dirt, mold or algae-If any of these are excessive on your tile roof, it may be best to consult with a tile roofing contractor. For small amounts, a long brush and a mild cleaner will work wonders.

Efflorescence-This is a naturally occurring reaction of rainwater affecting the limestone in the clay. It produces whitish marks and streaks, but it is not harmful and does not need to be removed. It will naturally go away with time.

Broken tiles-If you have many broken tiles, contact a tile roofing contractor. If it is just one or two, you can replace them yourself. There are many helpful videos available on the internet to assist you with this.

Roof And Loft Space Ventilation

Attics and loft spaces often get forgotten about, but it’s just as important to inspect these areas of the home on a regular basis as it is the surface of the roof itself.

Proper ventilation is essential to help regulate the temperature difference between the interior and exterior regions of the roof as such that it helps prevent the build-up of moisture and keeps humidity to a minimum.

If there’s a lack of ventilation, the structure of your roof will deteriorate at a much faster rate while also having a significant impact on your energy bills as well as the comfort of your home.

Roofs are particularly susceptible to damage in overheated and poorly ventilated homes. Fortunately, such problems are usually easy to fix, provided you identify them early enough.

When inspecting your attic, be sure to look out for any mould or mildew, since this indicates a damp problem, either due to a leaking roof or poor ventilation.

If the area is particularly damp, especially after rain, then a leaking roof is the most likely culprit. However, mould doesn’t necessarily need a great deal of moisture to form, in which case it could be a product of poor ventilation alone.

This is most likely to be the case if the area is still fairly dry.

Simple Roof Maintenance Tips to Ensure a Healthy Roof

The cost of replacing or repairing a roof is an expense most of us can ill afford. Luckily, by spending a few hours periodically to carry out scheduled maintenance, you can actually catch roof problems and solve them before they spiral out of control.

Below are seven simple roof maintenance tips to ensure a healthy roof for as long as possible:

1. Shingles

Keep a close eye to detect any missing or damaged shingles and/or roof sealant. Simply cleaning shingles and keeping them free of dirt can also reduce the risk for algae, moss, fungal and lichen growth that can compromise your roof’s integrity.

If you notice that some shingles on the roof are worn, damaged or missing, you must act fast. If you feel you can handle it, replace them yourself, but if not you can engage a professional contractor. It is critical that you check, since shingle damage is part of normal roof wear, and shingles alone are simple and cheap to replace.

2. Sealant

Replace the roof sealant as needed. Inspect every area of the roof where there is sealant and identify any signs of cracking or wear and tear. If present, you will need to remove the old sealant completely and apply new sealant in each area

3. Trim Overhanging Branches

As you go about routinely inspecting your roof, be on the lookout for trees that are growing near your home. If there are branches hanging too closely to or directly above your roof, they need trimming. The reason is that falling leaves will collect on the roof, retain moisture and then start to rot your tiles, making them much weaker. If this remains unsolved for a long time, it may result in even more damage to the entire roofing structure.

4. Inspect for Rust

If you constructed your roof using any metallic parts, then you need to check regularly that there is not corrosion/rust on the metal parts. If you notice rust developing, it’s important to wire-brush to remove the rust, prime and finally paint the affected areas of the metal to retain keep them healthy longer.

5. Clean the Gutters

Gutters that clog up can cause a lot of damage to your roof. The reason for this is that water accumulating on gutters can easily make its way underneath your roofing structure. By keeping your gutters clean and in good repair, you ensure they can serve their intended purpose, alleviating any immediate dangers to your roof in the process.

Slate Roof Installation With Hip And Ridge Joints

Roofing Buying Guide

Some home repairs, you can put off indefinitely. A leaky roof is not one of them. Cracked, curled, or missing roof shingles demand immediate attention. If you neglect them, they can lead to severe water damage that can seriously drain your savings account.

At Consumer Reports, we test asphalt shingles because that’s what most folks have on their homes. Our test results show that not only does performance vary widely among brands, but also among different product lines from a single manufacturer.

Water Will Find a Way In

Water marks on a ceiling, or worse, dripping water, may have you worried that your whole roof is in tatters. But just because there’s a leak doesn’t mean your roof will require a massive amount of repairs. Sometimes stopping it is as simple as filling a crack with caulk, replacing a few shingles, or installing some flashing—a membrane or layer of metal that provides a mechanical barrier to redirect water at corners, crevices, gaps, and other spots vulnerable to leaking.

Fallen tree limbs, hail, and even wind can loosen or remove shingles. Damaged flashing is another common culprit. Even rubberized boots around plumbing pipes, or with improperly installed satellite dishes or solar panels can cause isolated leaks. To determine what kind of leak you’ve got on your hands, first try to trace it to its origin.

Looking for Leaks

It’s easiest to find a leak when it’s raining outside. Remember that water often accumulates at a spot that’s different from where it’s entering—it generally runs down the length of a rafter or stud and only drips once it reaches a low point.

Essential Tips On Choosing The Right Roofing Installation Contractors

Your roof is the first and probably most important defense against the elements, like hail storms. Roofing installation projects also tend to be quite complicated and costly, choosing the right contractor can help ease your mind while ensuring that every cent counts.

Getting the right roof installed by the right roofing installation contractors will not only ensure that it holds up to the elements for as long as possible, but also helps alleviate most of the concerns homeowners have concerning the quality of work performed through the provision of service guarantees, and manufacturer warranties.

Experience

When it comes to roofing installation, the main rule of thumb is to always go with an experienced service provider. Hiring a roofing company that has overseen the completion of numerous projects, successfully, comes with a variety of advantages.

Reputation

Before hiring a roofing contractor, be sure to find out as much as you can about their reputation. Contact the roofer and ask them to provide you with examples of their most recent work. This will give you an idea of the type of projects they excel in.

Written Agreement

A written agreement gives homeowners, and contractor’s an official referral point in case of any disagreements on essential project details crop up during or at the end of the project. These contracts usually document important project details including pricing, quality of materials to be used and project duration among others.

Roofing Calculator – Estimate your Roofing Costs

What to Expect: In this guide we’ll cover the following roofing options: asphalt shingles, wood shingles and shakes, metal roofing, concrete, clay, and fiber-cement tiles, natural and faux slate, and the new Tesla solar tiles that have so far proven to be more of vaporware than a real product.

Types of Roofing Materials

These most common options cover more than 95 percent of residential roofs in the United States, so unless you’ve got something unusual in mind like solar tiles – oh, wait, we’ve included those – or a vegetative green roof, the options you’re considering are likely discussed here.

Asphalt shingles

More than 75 percent of all single-family homes in the US are roofed with asphalt shingles, though that number is slowly shrinking thanks to the more energy-efficient and durable metal roofing.

There are two types of asphalt shingles:

Fiberglass shingles start with a fiberglass mesh mat that is covered in asphalt and topped with granules that provide color and reflect some of the sunlight. Shingles made with fiberglass are lightweight and resist tearing.

Organic asphalt shingles begin with paper, often recycled, that is saturated in asphalt and covered with granules. The shingles are heavier and harder to work with than fiberglass, but they generally offer better stability in high winds. Although you can still see them on many roofs, organic shingles have been mostly phased out or discontinued over the course of last decade. Why? Manufactures have stopped making organic shingles due to their tendency to dry out, become less-waterproof and more prone to excess moisture absorption.

Wood shingles and shakes

Wood delivers a natural dose of beauty to any roof. Cedar, redwood, cypress and pressure-treated pine shingles and shakes are available

Roof Buying Guide: Choosing the Right Roofing

Expert advice about how to sort through the various types of roofing to choose the best one for your home.

If you’re thinking about buying a new roof, be prepared to pick from possibilities that range from the familiar to materials you never knew existed. In this article, we’ll help you become more acquainted with your options and the features you should consider when comparing one to another. Then we’ll point you to more detailed information about each roofing material.

Some roofing materials, such as slate, wood shakes, and copper, have remained virtually unchanged for centuries. But a considerable array of other roofing materials have joined them, from the perennial favorite, asphalt-fiberglass, to newer products made from fiber cement, concrete, and plastic composites. Most of these have been developed over the past couple of decades with an eye toward greater durability, easier installation, lower cost, sustainability, and other features homeowners want

What to Consider

It’s easy to fall into the pattern of just replacing your existing material with a newer version of the same thing. Though this often makes sense because you know that the existing material worked okay until recently, you may be missing an opportunity to upgrade the look and functionality of your home’s roof

Weather Barrier

Because your home’s roof is the primary barrier between you and Mother Nature, it’s critical to choose a material that will shelter your home reliably. It must shed rain and snow, hold up in wind, and endure the sun for many years. Depending upon your climate and the shape and orientation of your home’s roof, some materials will do this job better than others.

Roof Slope

The slope of your roof’s surface is a consideration that may eliminate some some roofing possibilities, especially if the slope is low. A roof’s slope is the number of inches it rises for every 12 inches of horizontal “run.” For example, a roof with a “4-in-12 slope” rises 4 inches for every 12 inches of horizontal run.

HOW TO CHOOSE A ROOF FOR YOUR HOME

From natural materials like slate and wood to manmade products such as asphalt, sheet metal, and plastic polymers, there are more types and styles of roofing to choose from today than ever before.

Pros and Cons

Some types of roofing may be better suited for your house than others. Factors such as the slope of the roof and strength of the framing could limit your choices.

Asphalt shingles are the most popular type of roofing for homes, comprising over 80% of residential roofing market.

Materials: Made of either an organic paper fiber mat (better for cold weather and wind resistance) or fiberglass (more fire and moisture resistant) impregnated with asphalt and coated with mineral granules.

Appearance: Available in traditional 3-tab shingles or thicker laminated “architectural” shingles.

Eco-Friendly: Petroleum-based product that’s not eco-friendly. Can be recycled, though often taken to landfills.

Durability: Not very durable. Algae-resistant shingles are available in humid climates to prevent staining.

Weight: Moderate in weight.

Slope: Can be used on low to steeper-sloped roofs.

Fire & Wind: Good fire resistance, fair wind resistance.

Cost: Inexpensive to moderate.

metal roofing lasts longer and is more wind resistant.

Materials: May be composed of steel, aluminum, copper, or zinc alloy. Steel roofs come with either a zinc coating or painted finish. Copper roofs are installed unfinished and acquire a protective green patina with age.

Appearance: Available in sheets or in shingles that resemble other materials. Can be installed with the fasteners hidden (standing seam) or exposed.

Eco-Friendly: May be made from recycled materials and can be recycled when replaced. Absorb a third less heat than asphalt.

Durability: Fairly to very durable, depending on the material.

Weight: Lightweight.

Slope: Available for low or steep sloped roofs.

Fire & Wind: Good resistance to both fire and wind.

Cost: Moderate (steel) to expensive (copper)

Curved Metal Roofing

A Guide to Selecting the Right Metal Roof Panel

With the great variety on the market, one of the main questions we, as metal roof panel manufacturers, get from customers is “How do I select the right panel for my project?” The answer can generally be found by examining a number of criteria, including the properties of the roof, the region and climate, geometry, slope, warranty type…among other key factors.

Slope— Slope is the first consideration as just this one aspect will eliminate certain panels, making it easier to narrow down options right from the start. The two types of roof slopes are low slope and steep slope.

A low-slope roof, commonly found in commercial applications, is one whose slope is less than 3:12. The benefits include a simpler geometry that is often much less expensive to construct, and the requirement of fewer materials than a steep slope, thereby reducing material costs.

A steep slope roof, more common in residential construction, is one whose slope is greater than 3:12. Steeper slopes are ideal for areas that have higher snow loads and will also prevent the possibility of ponding water on the roof. Since the roof is a visible part of the structure, choosing a metal roof for residential construction often skews more toward aesthetic considerations.

Location/Climate— The location and climate of the project is a factor, specifically when looking at certifications/regulatory product approvals, which will limit the panels you can you use within specific regions. This is most relevant to Dade County, the state of Florida, and the Texas Coast, as well as certain snow regions.

How to Choose a Metal Roof

Metal can be formed into a variety of roofing materials, including these stone-coated steel shingles from Boral. Metal’s market share is on the rise, now accounting for about 14% of the total residential re-roofing market.

Metal roofing has a long history in the U.S. but until 20 years ago it was a bit player in residential construction with just a 3.6% share of the reroofing market. That number has roughly quadrupled since then, according to an industry trade group, as metal claims an increasingly larger slice of the pie

What happened? Product offerings are more extensive than the simple corrugated panels that have long been used on barns and sheds. Metal roofing is available in a range of styles — from several kinds of standing seam to a variety of stamped metal shingles that look like slate, clay tile, and even asphalt. Paint and stone coatings are more sophisticated and more durable, giving roofing a very long service life while appealing to homeowners with a variety of aesthetic preferences.

The industry also is working harder to win over consumers who once thought that metal roofing was too hot, too heavy, noisy, or prone to rust, says Dick Bus, president of ATAS International and head of the Metal Roofing Alliance. “Those myths are gone, and people want to reroof with something that has some permanence to it,” he said. “Metal roofing that’s properly installed can last upwards of 50 to 60 years or more.”

Metal roofing may never catch up to asphalt in the residential arena simply because of cost. Light gauge, through-fastened panels might be competitive with asphalt on a simple roof shape, but the industry acknowledges that a standing seam or metal shingle roof can be two or three times the initial cost of asphalt. Still, manufacturers think they can continue expanding on the strength of other attributes: long-term performance, recyclability, high fire resistance, and low maintenance.

CHOOSING A METAL ROOF – FIVE MISTAKES YOU MUST AVOID

Unless you’re involved in the roofing or construction business or you’re one of the few outside the industry that have purchased more than one metal roof, it’s likely that your initial investigation into the topic leaves you bewildered at the great variety of choices. We routinely get emails and contact forms with questions in the comment section asking, “How much for a metal roof?” Unfortunately, that’s a little like asking, “How much for a new car?” The answer to both variable – what are you looking for? We supply metal roofing that costs anywhere from $1 a square foot to over $20 – and in every case it’s fair to say, “You get what you pay for!” The reason for the tremendous range is that there literally hundreds of choices that are all “metal roofs.”

Assume all metal roofs are the same.

They are NOT. They vary by metal type, thickness of metal, finish, and profile. Metal roofs come in more shapes, sizes, types, finishes, thicknesses, and those differences can affect performance, lifespan, durability and price

Assume all roofers know about metal roofing. 

This is simply not true. While most roofers and roof contractors claim to be able to install ANY roof – including metal – the fact of the matter is that most of them don’t have much experience with metal roofing systems. Since composition shingles are the most common roofing material by a wide margin (no coincidence they’re the cheapest by a wide margin!), that is the product with which most roofers are experienced. I can tell you from many years of first-hand experience with the finished jobs that there is a GREAT difference between the finished job of an experienced and properly trained metal roof specialist and that of the average “roofer.” If you’re going to hire someone to install your carefully selected roof, make every effort to make certain that they have years of sheet metal practical experience. You’ll be sorry if you don’t.

Buy the wrong metal roof for your application. 

As good as metal roofs can be, they must be matched to the job. For example, while metal roofs can be excellent in snow country, the wrong metal roof can “hook” moving snow and ice and cause damage, while a properly chosen and executed metal roof will shed snow and ice without damage. Similarly, there are many metal roof materials that work well in locations near salt water, but choosing the wrong base metal and premature orrosion can result, dramatically reducing the life span of the roof.

Buy a metal roof based on price alone.

Just as you wouldn’t buy a car (or house or television or refrigerator, etc., etc.) on price

alone, the same applies to metal roofing materials. There’s a reason one metal roof is cheaper than another, and it’s usually because the material is thinner, the metal is cheaper (and less corrosion resistant), the finish is poor or the profile is weak. To ensure you get good value for the money you’re spending, make sure you’re spending enough to get a metal roof that will do the job you’re expecting.

Key Considerations for Selecting the Right Metal Roof

Selecting the right metal roof for your home can be a challenge. Once you’ve decided on metal for protecting your home, there are still many decisions ahead about which products will best meet the demands of our local climate, look great, and be the easiest to maintain

Industry-leading PVDF coating technology. Many people choose metal roofs in order to avoid the streaking and staining that attacks granulated-surface shingles. Kynar 500® and Hylar 5000® PVDF resin-based finishes offer the best resistance to streaking and staining. These finishes are available in many colors and even multi-hued shades, offering the best combination of durability and fade resistance.

“Self-Cleaning” Valleys. Let’s face it, a lot of debris ends up on your roof; tree leaves, pine needles, seed pods, ice, and snow. They all travel down your roof and end up in any valleys the roof may have. Many metal roofs have “closed” valley systems with hidden waterways to channel water off of the roof. These hidden waterways, however, will clog up with debris and then the water path is blocked and bad things (leaks!) happen. “Self-Cleaning” valleys carry the water and debris on top of the roof and can’t clog.

Premium Certified Products. The Metal Construction Association has developed a Quality Certification Program which recognizes products and manufacturers that meet high levels of standards in terms of raw materials and processes. We strongly encourage products and manufacturers that are part of this program. Kassel and Irons products all meet this certification.

Special Flashings. Many roofs have areas which require special care, including special flashings. Unlike temporary roofing solutions, you can’t just depend upon sealants for metal roofing. If your roof has dead valleys, skylights, chimneys, flared gables, or other unusual things, make sure that you understand exactly how these will be handled by your contractor.

Key Considerations for Choosing a Metal Roofing Supplier

As a manufacturer of specialty residential metal roofing, we’d love to have the opportunity to work hard for your confidence. However, whether you consider us or not, we want to share with you the key things to consider when choosing a metal roofing supplier

Types and Styles of Metal Roofing

As you research metal roofing suppliers, it will not be unusual to find that different suppliers focus on providing different types of metal roofing. A common distinction is whether they focus on vertical seam metal roofing or modular panel metal roofs that look like wood shakes, slate, tile, or other materials. However, amongst the vertical seam products, you will find further differentiation with manufacturers producing exposed fastener products, nail hem panels, true clip-fastened standing seam panels, and mechanically-seamed standing seam panels. Amongst the modular panel manufacturers, you will find companies specializing in painted products, usually using the industry-leading PVDF technology, and stone-coated products. As you start to zero in on the style of metal roof that best meets your needs and the architectural design of your home, we suggest choosing a supplier and manufacturer that has significant experience with your preferred style of metal roofing.

Taking into account the “ship-to” location of your new roof is important. Here’s why:

If the choice for your home is a vertical seam roof, the panels will likely be ordered in custom lengths sized from the bottom of the roof to the peak. On many homes, these panels can be from 15 – 30’ in length or even longer. Shipping these panels over long distances can be quite costly. While shipping a long distance may be necessary for Premium Grade panels, lower grade panels are produced regionally and may only need to be shipped 50 miles or less depending on where you live. The required shipping distance will impact your cost as well as the embedded energy in your roof’s environmental footprint.

Experience

The experience level of your metal roofing supplier is very important. There are things that companies learn to do better over the years, especially in the areas of flashing design and installation details, that impact a roof’s long-term performance. Additionally, your metal roofing manufacturer will provide the product warranty for your roof and you will want to seek a manufacturer with proven history and stability that indicates their ability to support any future warranty claims. You will also find that the more experienced and stable manufacturers will usually play industry leadership roles with highly educational websites and active participation in industry trade associations such as the Metal Construction Association and the Metal Roofing Alliance.

Raw Materials

Be certain to confirm the quality and grade of metals and coatings used by the manufacturers and suppliers you are considering. Many manufacturers are using non-North American metals for their roofing systems as these metals are less expensive. If buying a roof made from USA-produced raw materials is important to you, you can seek out companies that produce their products only from domestic raw materials. An additional way to determine raw material quality is by seeking out suppliers that meet or exceed Metal Construction Association’s Certified Metal Roofing program requirements.